Edward Tufte, Envisioning data.

Edward Tufte is s an American statistician and professor emeritus of political science, statistics, and computer science at Yale University. In his practise he aims to take complicated data and simplify them. He argues “power point is evil”.

“This book celebrates escapes from the flatlands of both paper and computer screen, showing superb displays of high-dimensional complex data. The most design-oriented of Edward Tufte’s books, Envisioning Information shows maps, charts, scientific presentations, diagrams, computer interfaces, statistical graphics and tables, stereo photographs, guidebooks, courtroom exhibits, timetables, use of color, a pop-up, and many other wonderful displays of information. The book provides practical advice about how to explain complex material by visual means, with extraordinary examples to illustrate the fundamental principles of information displays. Topics include escaping flatland, color and information, micro/macro designs, layering and separation, small multiples, and narratives. Winner of 17 awards for design and content. 400 illustrations with exquisite 6- to 12-color printing throughout. Highest quality design and production.”

 

Edward was actually hired by NASSA to simplify the complexity of all their data. Tufte blames technology for bad thinking. Probably the best statistical graphic ever drawn, this map by Charles Joseph Minard portrays the losses suffered by Napoleon’s army in the Russian campaign of 1812. A subject matter with so much hurt and pain behind it is presented in such a cold way. The way he conveys data does not convey any form of emotion. Its plain and simple, straight to the point.

poster_OrigMinard

 

ei_bookcover

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